Theory and Note Reading Practice

My students love music theory!  I know!  I can’t believe it either.

I have to thank the authors of the wonderful books I use.  Lina Ng and Ying Ying Ng (no relation) have both produced beautifully illustrated sticker books for young (and old) pianists to learn theory.

Finding the right theory book for a student can be tricky. For young students I use Ying Ying Ng’s Music Theory for Young Children which is a set of four colourful sticker books which take them from understanding left and right hands, to Grade 1.  For older children and adults it is a bit more difficult.  If they are happy with the sticker books then that’s great.  If they are competent then starting them on Ying Ying Ng’s Music Theory for Young Musicians – Grade 1 is good.  A problem arises when they think the sticker books are too young, but the Grade 1 book is too fast.  For those I use Lina Ng’s My First Theory Book which is a set of three books but doesn’t quite cover everything needed for Grade 1.

But what happens when they need extra practice?  You can’t photocopy the pages for them to do again, because apart from contravening copyright law, it’s a bit demotivating!  In the past I have created my own worksheets, but after the joys of the beautifully illustrated sticker books they don’t really want my scrappy worksheets!  Each student has different needs so I do use their manuscript books to quickly mark out some exercises.  However, if you watch the students doing these repetitive exercises, they tend to work out the first couple of answers and then just copy across the rest.  Hmmm, not ideal.

But wait a minute – I’ve just discovered a fabulous new website created by Ricci Adams.

http://www.musictheory.net/exercises

You can create note reading games and send them to your students.  They can play them on their pc at home (actually they have iphone apps too but I haven’t looked into these – since I don’t actually have an iphone!!).  You can tailor them to the student by selecting the note range they are practising and there’s no copying!!

Here are a few exercises I have created for my current students

Key Skills – Bass F to Treble G
Treble Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/bgkyryyyy
Bass Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/nx1yryyyy
Both Clefs – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/dgkx1yryyyy

 

Initial – Bottom C to Top C
Treble Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/bgpyryyyy
Bass Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/nm1yryyyy
Both Clefs – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/dgpm1yryyyy

 

Level 1 – All stave notes
Treble Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/bgtyryyyy
Bass Clef – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/n81yryyyy
Both Clefs – www.musictheory.net/exercises/note/dgt81yryyyy

 

The students can play the games at home and then report back with their score.  I tried it with my son, age 6, and he kept on playing, and playing, and playing!  Well that can’t be bad can it!?

The website provides so much more than just note reading.  For beginners it can test them on their keyboard geography.  For more advanced students it can test key signatures, intervals, chords.  There are also aural tests for recognising chords, scales and intervals.  I think I’m going to be using this site over and over!  Thank you Ricci Adams!

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